Benign Esophageal Diseases, and Endoscopic Management of Neoplasia
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ISDE continues its series presenting the best of the best free papers submitted for ISDE 2020.  In this edition we will consider papers that deal with benign conditions of the esophagus, as well as endoscopic treatment of dysplasia.  After presentation of 8 free papers, Professor Ken Wang from Mayo Clinic will give a state of the art lecture on management of dysplastic Barrett’s esophagus.  This 2 hour session will showcase novel work, and provide the practitioner with a framework for management of these complicated patients. 

 After attending this event, the participant should be able to state the correct use of endoscopic therapies for precancerous and cancerous conditions of the esophagus.


Long-Term Outcome of Laparoscopic Heller–Dor Operation: Results at a Median 20-Year Follow Up
Andrea Costantini
Italy, University of Padua
Long-Term Outcome of Laparoscopic Heller–Dor Operation: Results at a Median 20-Year Follow Up
Since its introduction in 1993, Laparoscopic Heller-Dor (LHD) operation has been the gold standard treatment for esophageal achalasia. Little is known, however, of the natural story of the operated patients in the long run. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term outcome of patients who underwent LHD more than 20 years ago, in order to provide benchmark data to which new techniques should compare.
Andrea Costantini  
Italy, University of Padua
Andrea Costantini was born in 1991. He graduated (cum laude) in Medicine and Surgery in 2018 at the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy, discussing a thesis on "Poem vs Laparoscopic Heller Myotomy in the Treatment of Esophageal Achalasia: A case-control study from two high volume Centers using the propensity score”. This study was presented at DDW 2019 in San Diego, being awarded as one of the three “Best presentations” at the 34th SSAT Annual Residents and Fellows Research Conference, and published on J Gastrointestinal Surg 2020 Mar;24(3):505-515. At present, he is 1st-year Resident in General Surgery at the University of Padua, Italy.
Randomised Trial of Laparoscopic Nissen Vs. Anterior 180-Degree Partial Fundoplication - Late Clinical Outcomes at 15-20 Years
Victoria Rudolph-Stringer
Australia, Flinders Medical Centre
Randomised Trial of Laparoscopic Nissen Vs. Anterior 180-Degree Partial Fundoplication - Late Clinical Outcomes at 15-20 Years
Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for gastro-oesophageal reflux is followed by troublesome side effects in some patients. Partial fundoplications are proposed for reflux control with less side effects. We reported earlier outcomes from a randomised control trial of Nissen vs. anterior 180° partial fundoplication, with a good outcome following anterior 180° partial fundoplication at up to 10 years follow-up. For this study we determined very late clinical outcomes at up to 20 years follow-up.
Victoria Rudolph-Stringer  
Australia, Flinders Medical Centre
Dr. Victoria Rudolph-Stringer is from Adelaide, Australia. She first began her research in fundoplication procedures as a medical student under the supervision of Professor David Watson and Dr. Tim Bright. Victoria is now completing her internship at Flinders Medical Centre and has a strong interest in general surgery.
Nitrous Oxide Cryoballoon Ablation is a Safe, Effective and Durable Endoscopic Treatment for Dysplastic Barrett’s Esophagus
Mohamad Dbouk
USA, Johns Hopkins University
Nitrous Oxide Cryoballoon Ablation is a Safe, Effective and Durable Endoscopic Treatment for Dysplastic Barrett’s Esophagus
Nitrous oxide cryoballoon (CB) ablation can effectively and safely eradicate dysplasia and intestinal metaplasia (IM) in patients with dysplastic BE but the durability of treatment effect is unknown. We evaluated the safety, efficacy and durability of CB ablation for complete eradication of dysplasia and IM.
Mohamad Dbouk  
USA, Johns Hopkins University
Mohamad Dbouk earned his MD degree from the American University of Beirut medical school in 2018. He moved to the US to gain more experience in academic research before continuing his medical training. Mohamad is currently a postdoctoral research fellow at Michael Goggins’ Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection laboratory. He also works with Dr. Mimi Canto on other gastrointestinal cancers such as esophageal cancer, focusing on new methods and techniques that can help eradicate Barrett’s Esophagus.
Is Local Endoscopic Resection a Viable Therapeutic Option for Early Clinical Stage T1a and T1b Oesophageal Adenocarcinoma? A Propensity-Matched Analysis
Sivesh Kathir Kamarajah
UK, Royal Victoria Infirmary
Is Local Endoscopic Resection a Viable Therapeutic Option for Early Clinical Stage T1a and T1b Oesophageal Adenocarcinoma? A Propensity-Matched Analysis
The role of endoscopic resection (ER) in the management of subsets of clinical T1N0 oesophageal adenocarcinoma is controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of ER versus oesophagectomy in node negative cT1a and cT1b oesophageal adenocarcinoma.
Sivesh Kathir Kamarajah  
UK, Royal Victoria Infirmary
Sivesh Kamarajah is currently an NIHR Academic Clinical Fellow in General Surgery at University Hospital Birmingham NHS Trust. He is currently steering committee member for the Student Audit and Research in Surgery (STARSurg) National Collaborative, the International, multicentre prospective cohort study, Oesophagogastric Anastomosis Audit (OGAA), and the CovidSurg Collaborative.
The Inflammatory-Metaplasia-Dysplasia-Oesophageal Adenocarcinoma Sequence: The Role of the Microbiome
Jessie Elliott
Ireland, Mercy University Hospital
The Inflammatory-Metaplasia-Dysplasia-Oesophageal Adenocarcinoma Sequence: The Role of the Microbiome
The human microbiota, the collection of microbes that inhabit the human body, is increasingly recognized as playing a role in human health. A seminal example of this relationship is Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer oncogenesis. The decline in H.pylori prevalence and non-cardia gastric cancer incidence have coincided with the rise in oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) incidence. We sought to explore the relationship between the gastric and oesophageal microbiome and OAC oncogenesis.
Jessie Elliott  
Ireland, Mercy University Hospital
Jessie Elliott is a Specialist Registrar in General Surgery in Ireland, with a specific interest in Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery. She graduated from Trinity College Dublin and completed a PhD at University College Dublin and the National Esophagogastric Centre at St. James’s Hospital, Dublin, studying changes in eating behavior and gut function among patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal cancer surgery. In 2015, was awarded a Health Research Board fellowship to support her work. The primary focus of her research is to develop interventions to improve nutrition and quality-of-life among patients with gastrointestinal disease. To this end, gut hormone physiology and the gut microbiome are current areas of interest.
The Characterization of Dysplasia in Barrett’s Esophagus - A Prospective Nationwide Registry from The RIBBON Network
Lisa O’Byrne
Ireland, St James Hospital
The Characterization of Dysplasia in Barrett’s Esophagus - A Prospective Nationwide Registry from The RIBBON Network
Barrett’s Esophagus is the main pathological precursor to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), dysplasia is known to be one of the principal predictors of progression to malignancy. The RIBBON Registry was established with six academic medical centers in the Republic of Ireland to identify and manage high risk Barrett’s Esophagus (BE) patients. From our database of over 4,000 patients our aim was to establish characteristics of those patients who progressed to dysplasia and furthermore to malignancy.
Lisa O’Byrne  
Ireland, St James Hospital
Dr. Lisa O' Byrne is a graduate of Trinity College Dublin in 2017. Since she has developed a keen interest in research and has been involved in the Barrett's Esophagus research group at St. James Hospital, Dublin. She is currently in her second year of Core Surgical Training in Dublin, Ireland.
The Role of the Microbiome, GERD and Inflammation Have on Barrett’s Esophagus
Kenneth Wang
USA, Mayo Clinic
The Role of the Microbiome, GERD and Inflammation Have on Barrett’s Esophagus
Abstract coming soon!
Kenneth Wang  
USA, Mayo Clinic
Kenneth Wang is the Kathy and Russ Van Cleve Professor of Gastroenterology Research at the Mayo Clinic Rochester. He is the Director of the Barrett’s Esophagus Unit which specializes in translational research for diagnosis and therapy of esophageal neoplasia. He has been funded by the NIH for the past 26 consecutive years as a principal investigator on multiple grants. He is a past president of the ISDE and of the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. He has received the Schindler Award from the ASGE, as well as the MASGE. He is a Fellow of the Japanese Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Society, AGA, ACG, and ACP. He has been an editor of Diseases of the Esophagus, associate editor for the American Journal of Gastroenterology and Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. He has published over 300 manuscripts and 25 book chapters
Speakers
Andrea Costantini MD
Italy, University of Padua
Andrea Costantini was born in 1991. He graduated (cum laude) in Medicine and Surgery in 2018 at the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy, discussing a thesis on "Poem vs Laparoscopic Heller Myotomy in the Treatment of Esophageal Achalasia: A case-control study from two high volume Centers using the propensity score”. This study was presented at DDW 2019 in San Diego, being awarded as one of the three “Best presentations” at the 34th SSAT Annual Residents and Fellows Research Conference, and published on J Gastrointestinal Surg 2020 Mar;24(3):505-515. At present, he is 1st-year Resident in General Surgery at the University of Padua, Italy.
Victoria Rudolph-Stringer MD
Australia, Flinders Medical Centre
Dr. Victoria Rudolph-Stringer is from Adelaide, Australia. She first began her research in fundoplication procedures as a medical student under the supervision of Professor David Watson and Dr. Tim Bright. Victoria is now completing her internship at Flinders Medical Centre and has a strong interest in general surgery.
Mohamad Dbouk MD
USA, Johns Hopkins University
Mohamad Dbouk earned his MD degree from the American University of Beirut medical school in 2018. He moved to the US to gain more experience in academic research before continuing his medical training. Mohamad is currently a postdoctoral research fellow at Michael Goggins’ Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection laboratory. He also works with Dr. Mimi Canto on other gastrointestinal cancers such as esophageal cancer, focusing on new methods and techniques that can help eradicate Barrett’s Esophagus.
Sivesh Kathir Kamarajah MD
UK, Royal Victoria Infirmary
Sivesh Kamarajah is currently an NIHR Academic Clinical Fellow in General Surgery at University Hospital Birmingham NHS Trust. He is currently steering committee member for the Student Audit and Research in Surgery (STARSurg) National Collaborative, the International, multicentre prospective cohort study, Oesophagogastric Anastomosis Audit (OGAA), and the CovidSurg Collaborative.
Jessie Elliott MD
Ireland, Mercy University Hospital
Jessie Elliott is a Specialist Registrar in General Surgery in Ireland, with a specific interest in Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery. She graduated from Trinity College Dublin and completed a PhD at University College Dublin and the National Esophagogastric Centre at St. James’s Hospital, Dublin, studying changes in eating behavior and gut function among patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal cancer surgery. In 2015, was awarded a Health Research Board fellowship to support her work. The primary focus of her research is to develop interventions to improve nutrition and quality-of-life among patients with gastrointestinal disease. To this end, gut hormone physiology and the gut microbiome are current areas of interest.
Lisa O’Byrne MD
Ireland, St James Hospital
Dr. Lisa O' Byrne is a graduate of Trinity College Dublin in 2017. Since she has developed a keen interest in research and has been involved in the Barrett's Esophagus research group at St. James Hospital, Dublin. She is currently in her second year of Core Surgical Training in Dublin, Ireland.
Kenneth Wang MD
USA, Mayo Clinic
Kenneth Wang is the Kathy and Russ Van Cleve Professor of Gastroenterology Research at the Mayo Clinic Rochester. He is the Director of the Barrett’s Esophagus Unit which specializes in translational research for diagnosis and therapy of esophageal neoplasia. He has been funded by the NIH for the past 26 consecutive years as a principal investigator on multiple grants. He is a past president of the ISDE and of the American Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. He has received the Schindler Award from the ASGE, as well as the MASGE. He is a Fellow of the Japanese Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Society, AGA, ACG, and ACP. He has been an editor of Diseases of the Esophagus, associate editor for the American Journal of Gastroenterology and Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. He has published over 300 manuscripts and 25 book chapters
Chair / Co-Chair
Nicholas Shaheen MD
USA, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Prateek Sharma MD
Co-chair/Moderator
USA, University of Kansas School of Medicine
Kenneth Wang MD
Co-chair/Moderator
USA, Mayo Clinic


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